Mentoring Emerging Leaders – Part 3

Last week, we continued in a series looking at the role of a mentor and how they can both encourage and pray for those that God has entrusted to us to disciple. Today we will examine how to use teachable moments and offer godly counsel to those we disciple.

Take Advantage of Teachable Moments

Most of the time, the thing that separates great mentors from mediocre ones is that great mentors take the initiative of walking through the open doors of opportunity. See those teachable moments, and take the initiative to share a word fitly spoken.

Spend Time with Your Disciples .

You will never earn the right or have the opportunity to share a timely word with your disciples or mentees unless you spend time with them. Notice what Paul said in 1 Thessalonians 2:8:

“We cared so much for you that we were pleased to share with you not only the gospel of God but also our own lives because you had become dear to us.”

When you share your life with others, it will cost you. You will have to set aside your own agenda and live intentionally for your mentee. As Paul wrote to the church at Philippi, “Do nothing out of rivalry or conceit, but in humility consider others as more important than yourselves. Everyone should look out not only for his own interests, but also for the interests of others” (Phil. 2:3–4).

Look for Teachable Moments.

When you spend quality time with your mentees or disciples, it is important to look for teachable moments where God can use you to share a principle or truth when they are able to receive it.

When your mentees ask a question looking for an easy answer, you can respond with, “That’s a great question. What do you think?” It’s okay to leave your mentees hanging for a time without being quick to answer, letting them struggle with a question or a paradox.

This was one of Jesus’s chief teaching methods. He would frequently answer a question with a question. Notice His interaction with His disciples from Matthew 16:“

When Jesus came to the region of Caesarea Philippi, He asked His disciples, ‘Who do people say that the Son of Man is?’ And they said, ‘Some say John the Baptist; others, Elijah; still others, Jeremiah or one of the prophets.’ ‘But you,’ He asked them, ‘who do you say that I am?’Simon Peter answered, ‘You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God!’And Jesus responded, ‘Simon son of Jonah, you are blessed because flesh and blood did not reveal this to you, but My Father in heaven’”(Matt. 16:13–17).

Jesus asked a question and let His disciples think about it and answer. But notice how Jesus responded to their answer with another more direct question in verse 15: “But who do you say that I am?” Jesus didn’t let them repeat whatever the crowds were saying; He was asking them what they believed.

Offer Godly Counsel and Accountability

You should strive to help your disciples or mentees see things from God’s viewpoint and not a human perspective—to see things through the lens of the Word of God and not by the wisdom of the world.

When offering godly counsel, base your counsel on the Word of God! Help your disciples or mentees to see principles that apply in the gray areas that Scripture has not specifically addressed, including answers to questions like these:

  • Whom should I marry?
  • Is it wrong to smoke or drink?
  • Should I move to this city or another?

Also, you should offer accountability to those you disciple or mentor. You must hold those you disciple for God’s agenda in their lives and not to your own.

We all need someone in our lives who loves us well! We need someone who will ask the tough questions to hold us accountable for growth and ministry development and performance.

In a growing, healthy, gospel-centered relationship, this accountability should never be abused, yet the truth remains, “We can’t expect what we don’t inspect.”

First, this kind of relationship must be kingdom focused! The goal is to reach God’s goal for growth and ministry, not the mentor’s or disciplemaker’s.

Second, the relationship should be voluntary. It is based on freedom in Christ, not some legalistic rule. In this relationship, there is no room for control, manipulation, or coercion.

Third, this relationship should be flexible. Any healthy relationship must grow over time. This relationship should not be rigid, but it should leave room for adjustment and change.

Next week we will examine how we should be ready to ask deep questions and share spiritual insights with those we disciple.

The Heart of a Disciplemaker

The church has done a good job teaching people how to share their faith but it hasn’t done well at teaching them to share their lives.

There is no question Jesus commanded those who follow Him to make disciples. But what does that look like in everyday life? While most believers are clear that the Great Commission found in Matthew 28 calls us to make disciples, many simply don’t know how. Investing in the lives of others who will in turn invest themselves in others is not difficult, but it does require intentionality. Building authentic relationships that leave a legacy of Christ long past our lives should be the goal of every believer.

The church has done a good job teaching people how to share their faith but it hasn’t done well at teaching them to share their lives.

There is no question Jesus commanded those who follow Him to make disciples. But what does that look like in everyday life? While most believers are clear that the Great Commission found in Matthew 28 calls us to make disciples, many simply don’t know how. Investing in the lives of others who will in turn invest themselves in others is not difficult, but it does require intentionality. Building authentic relationships that leave a legacy of Christ long past our lives should be the goal of every believer. To accomplish this we must answer the following questions:

• What do gospel-centered relationships look like?

• What character qualities must we develop to deepen our walk with Christ and with others?

• How can we develop a heart for making disciples?

In, The Heart of a Disciplemaker, Tim LaFleur provides practical answers to these questions and more. Drawing from the Scripture, and his own life as a disciplemaker, Tim clarifies what a life lived for the glory of God looks like. Empowered by the Holy Spirit, every disciple of Jesus can develop character qualities that will encourage others to follow Christ through meaningful, dynamic, gospel-centered relationships. Relationships that leave a legacy, not for our name, but for the One whose name is above all names: Jesus Christ.

An Excerpt from “Heart Of A Disciplemaker.” Used by permission of Replicate Ministries. 

Don't Miss a Post

Subscribe to get our latest content by email.

We won't send you spam. Unsubscribe at any time. Powered by ConvertKit

This article was originally posted here. Used by permission.
2019-07-05T22:37:43+00:00

Leave A Comment